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Down from the Mountain

10 Feb

mountblue3(a sermon for February 10, 2013, the Last Sunday after Epiphany, based on Mark 9:2-9)

One summer several years ago now, our family did some camping at Mount Blue State Park, located in the beautiful western mountains of Maine; and as part of that experience, my children and I decided one morning that we would actually climb Mount Blue itself.  On paper, that didn’t seem like a hard thing; the park brochure said that the trail we were going to take was a relatively easy one, and what’s more, you could drive right up to the base of the mountain, park your car and then you only had to walk a mile and a half-long trail to reach the summit – what could be simpler?  Of course, what they don’t tell you is that’s a mile and a half straight up!

So I’ll admit, it was an arduous climb for the children and especially for the father(!), and honestly, we spent as much time sitting down to rest as we did actually walking (it’s no coincidence that the gift shops in those parts sell t-shirts, key chains and such that proclaim, “I survived Mount Blue!”).  Despite the huffing and puffing, however, we did make it to the top, and it was worth the climb – the view was amazing, a literal panorama of God’s glory revealed in the beauty of creation, and we pretty much spent the rest of the day just drinking it all in.

And I have to say, I’m feeling pretty good about what we’d accomplished, even getting a little cocky about it; I remember actually saying to my kids, “You know, this wasn’t easy, but in the eternal struggle of man versus wilderness, we triumphed!” Yes, I actually said this to my children …but then I made my real mistake, by adding these words: “…and getting back down is going to be a piece of cake!”

Definitely a mistake!  The fact is, heading back I made the interesting discovery that I was tired, my legs were stiff and hurting, my arthritic knees were starting to kill, and every single step I made walking down the mountain trail felt like it might well be my last!  And adding insult to injury was the fact that Jake (who was 14 at the time) and Zach (who was seven!) fairly well ran down the trail, leaving Sarah and I to slowly, painfully hobble our way down (and truth be told, as I found out much later, Sarah – my sweet little girl (!) – held back because she felt sorry for me!).  At one point we’re about three quarters of the way down, and we run into some hikers on their way up the trail, and one of them says to me, “There’s two kids down there – a big one and a little one – draped over the hood of a car.  Do they belong to you?”  And, somewhat warily, I said, “Yesss… Are they alright?”  “Oh, yeah,” he said back, “They’re just wondering if you’re going to make it back anytime soon!”

So much for the triumph of the mountaineer!  Needless to say, we did make it down eventually; tired and sore, but otherwise none the worse for wear.  It’d been a good time and a great memory for the kids and me, but I did learn an important lesson:  that oftentimes, the hardest part of climbing a mountain is coming back down – and eventually, you always have to come down from the mountain!

It’s a lesson I’ve thought about a great deal as I’ve been reflecting on this morning’s reading from Mark, the story we just shared of Christ’s transfiguration on the “high mountain apart,” in the presence of three of his disciples.   Actually, it makes sense that the setting for this particular story is a mountaintop, because throughout scripture mountains always hold a place of great significance – basically, if anyone from the Bible goes up to a mountain, you know something important is going to happen.  It was on a mountain, for example, where Moses was confronted by the burning bush, and later received the Ten Commandments.  The temple was built in Jerusalem on Mount Zion; one of Jesus’ most powerful teachings is now commonly referred to as the “sermon on the mount;” and even his crucifixion took place on that “hill, far away,” Golgotha, otherwise known as Mount Calvary.  In the Bible, mountains are always places of revelation and clarity and wonder; and more often than not, serve to illumine what happens beyond it!

And so it follows that it’s on the mountaintop where Peter, James and John see Jesus, bathed in brilliant light, and with incredible clarity come to recognize just who Jesus is, standing there and talking with Moses the lawgiver and Elijah the prophet. This is an experience that’s filled to overflowing with God’s mystery and power, and it’s awesome and terrifying all at the same time – it’s not surprising that Peter’s first thought is to preserve the moment forever: “It is good for us to be here,” he says, “let us make three dwellings, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.”

Mark makes the claim that Peter was so stunned by all of this that he just blurted this out without thinking, but I’ve always kind of thought that it was a awe-inspired gesture on Peter’s part, an effort to try to hang on to the feeling of this “mountaintop experience” as long as possible!  But of course, the thing about mountaintop experiences is that try as we might for it to be otherwise, they aren’t made to last – and the gospels all make it clear that as suddenly as this one began, it was over; that “the next minute the disciples were looking around, rubbing their eyes, seeing nothing but Jesus, only Jesus.” (The Message)  It’d been this incredible, fleeting moment of divine revelation, but now it was gone.

But here’s the thing – though the transfiguration “experience” had passed, their journey had just begun in just about every sense of the word; and we know that because of  the very next verse in Mark’s account of all this: that “they were coming down the mountain.”  You see, this is the other thing about mountaintop experiences – eventually you always have to come down from the mountain, and while that’s often the hard part, it’s also the place where true faith begins.

What’s interesting is that biblically speaking, the transfiguration story is essentially the mid-point of the gospel – up to this point, we’ve learned about Jesus’ teaching and healing acts, and his growing ministry.  And even after the experience of transfiguration, all that continues for Jesus and his disciples – except now it’s different.  Now it’s off to Jerusalem, with all that that journey implies.  In other words, we’ve had a moment of glory up on the mountain; but now it’s time to come down to the valley.  It’s time to go to the cross.

Likewise, it’s no coincidence that this is the story that bridges the boundary between the season of Epiphany, in which we revel in the light of Christ coming into the world, and the season of Lent, when we remember how darkness sought to overcome that light.  It’s a reminder to us that in the Christian life, we stand on the boundary between mountain and valley, light and darkness, radiance and pain.  In faith, we cannot avoid the darkness and pain; we can’t stay on the mountain forever – we do have to come down to face the valleys of life and all the dangers that dwell there.

There are those, of course, who would succumb to this notion that the Christian life is simply one mountaintop experience after another; and that a belief in Jesus somehow protects you from things like human hurt, personal tragedy and the injustices of life.  But the truth is that for believer and unbeliever alike, there is trouble in life, and it does rain on the just and unjust.  And anyone who approaches faith with the expectation that life will be all sunshine and roses will either drop out at the first sign of trouble, or else find glean on to some bad theology that convinces them that they are somehow personally at fault for every bad thing that happens.

It’s one of the great misunderstandings of the Christian faith, in my opinion, that its power is to be measured based purely on “good things” that happen.  The difference between this kind of thinking and true Christian faith is that we know there are dark valleys, and that the shadow of death lingers over so much of human experience – but nonetheless as we come down from the mountain we walk confidently, because we know we are not going into this valley alone but in the embrace of God, who brings us safely to green pastures and still waters.

This is true faith, friends; and what we discover in this transfiguration story we’ve shared today is that this faith finds its assurance in Jesus.

It’s there in the final moment of that wondrous experience, when the cloud overshadows the disciples there on the mountain, and as they hear a voice from heaven say, “This is my Son, the Beloved; listen to him!”  You see, whether they realized or understood it at all, these three slack-jawed, awestruck disciples had just been given the key to dealing with everything that was to come – Listen. Learn. TrustHear what Jesus is saying to you; learn from his teachings; and trust that you will be led safely through the dark valleys ahead.

I’m reminded of something Frederick Buechner wrote about a time in his life when he’d been filled with despair over his daughter’s ongoing struggle with the eating disorder anorexia.  As you can imagine, this would be a nearly impossible situation for any parent, and Buechner tells the story of how one day, driving back to his home in Vermont and sick with worry over his child, was forced to pull over to a highway rest stop so that he might at least compose himself for the remainder of his journey.  And there in the parking lot, Buechner spied a car with a vanity license plate; although, he noted later, this time it really wasn’t a vanity plate.  The plate read simply, in capital letters, “TRUST.”

Buechner saw it as a revelation, and in that precise moment, he said, a great sense of calm swept over his life and he knew he could go on.  Never mind that the vehicle in question was a company car owned by a New England bank trust department officer; it was the word “TRUST” that made the difference:  a simple insight, a little snippet of divine teaching, a vision of what was his all along:  love, strength… and hope.

Every once in a while, you know, we do get a glimpse of who Jesus is, and what he has to give us:  sometimes it comes in the midst of worship and prayer; other times in the kind of love and encouragement that’s shared between friends; perhaps in the fleeting memory of a particular time or place that stirs our heart just for the thought of it; a singular moment, that mountaintop experience in which we knew we were standing face to face with the Lord.

This morning’s gospel reminds us to hold on to such things even as we come down from the mountain; for these are the moments that will sustain us as we walk more deeply into life, and as our faith transforms us from those who merely plod along the way into those who walk boldly and in tandem with Jesus Christ; those who understand that even walking through the darkest of valleys, there’s going to be a light leading them forward.

Beloved, I hope and pray that whether your journey this week finds you climbing up the mountain, or making your way back down, you’ll be carrying that light as your own.

Thanks be to God!

AMEN and AMEN!

c. 2013   Rev. Michael W. Lowry

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Posted by on February 10, 2013 in Epiphany, Faith, Family Stories, Jesus, Maine, Sermon

 

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